Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Surf Fishing Basics Part 3 : Rigs for Bigger Fish!

Welcome back to Surf-fish.com! Getting back to basics , here are two more common rigs that are used at the beach....

These are big fish rigs. Just how big? How does a car hood sized skate or ray sound? Or how about a big Striper or a Trophy Red Drum? Sounds fun , huh? These rigs are what most people will use for these fish , so you'll need a rod and reel to handle both the weight of the rig , plus a long battle with a very determined fish. I recommend a surf rod in the neighborhood of 10-12 feet long with a MH action paired with a reel capable of holding at least 250 yards of 17-20 pound monofilament.



First is a flounder and fluke rig bass fishermen will be familiar with , that also gets a lot of use at the beach....

Use a 2 ounce egg sinker  , a swivel ,  and a 12-18" leader for small live bait , a classic "Carolina Rig" like bass fishermen use - with the sinker on the shock leader and a swivel , leader and a size 1-1/0 hook. I use a glass bead above the knot to keep rough edges from sinkers from nicking knots. Lots of people use this type of rig to target big flounder with a lot of success , but other fish will take it too. This rig is often baited with cigar minnows or strips of squid.

Next is an old standby for rough water , and one that casts better with bigger cut bait , the "Fish Finder"or "8-N-Bait". It's similar , but has a sinker slide or snap swivel with a 4-8 ounce Pyramid sinker attached  , instead of an egg sinker , on the shock leader above a bead , then a swivel with a very short leader (shorter is better for long casts) and a 4/0-5/0 hook. Some guys use Uni Knots , some use crimps for 50-60 pound mono to get the leader as short as possible. This keeps your rig and bait from helicoptering during the cast , and when a fish takes the bait the line runs free through the swivel so they don't feel the weight.Circle hooks or Octopus hooks work great on this rig , and it is the go to rig if you want to catch a bigger drum. Skates and rays will take it too , and they are always good for a fight , if nothing else. This rig is perfect for big pieces of cut bait , and small fish heads , so bait it up and launch it towards the other coast!

Tight lines!

JM  

8 comments :

  1. Josh awesome stuff! Pictures would help out! A noob like my self would benefit from some pictures.

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  2. good and helpful post

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  3. Hey josh! Great stuff! Heading out tommorow and this is my favorite website! Spent 45 minutes on here so far!

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    1. I'm glad you found some stuff to help you out! Tight lines!

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  4. Thanks for helping land locked folks like myself out (from Missouri). I started surf fishing last year on a family vacation with big river catfishing gear, and now just ordered my first Penn setup and plan on using these rigs.

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  5. This is very helpful. I keep losing my bait (shrimp and small fish). Not sure if something's biting and I'm missing it or if I'm not hooking it correctly and just losing it in the surf. Help, please! Many thanks

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    1. Deborah, thanks for stopping by, there isn't really a right or wrong way to hook most baits, as long as your hook is going through the middle. Small fish will pick bait apart, and you'll never notice a bite, as will crabs, but crabs will usually get tangled or leave claw marks on the leader. Getting washed off in the surf is another possibility. I check mine every 20 minutes or so, and add fresh as needed. You could also try a 1/4" piece of FishBites immitation bloodworm, or any flavor. They are tough. I like the bloodworm, clam, and sand flea flavors. Might not hurt to move to a smaller hook, if you think it's small fish. Tight lines!

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